Tag Archives: Yoko Tsuno

2015 Publishing Retrospective: Before Mako Came Yoko: Comparative Study of Pacific Rim and Yoko Tsuno

One of the aspects of independent publishing I like most is how I can publish different formats and lengths. This flexibility is a gift as I enjoy to write different kinds of fiction and non fiction.

Last year, I started publishing essays in Kindle format. So far I have published two, and have a third one lined up for later this year. Down the road, I will probably gather several of them and add some bonus ones to make a collection that will be in both digital and print formats. This is a long-term project though!

The first of these essays I published for Kindle last year was Before Mako Came Yoko: Comparative Study of Pacific Rim and Yoko Tsuno.

In 2013, Mako Mori, from Guillermo Del Toro’s Science Fiction movie ‘Pacific Rim’, provoked extensive fan engagement. Much praise was given to the character because of her personality and her unique narrative. Yet, a character very similar to Mako emerged decades prior to her: Yoko Tsuno, the main character from the eponymous comic book series created by Belgian author Roger Leloup. Mako and Yoko having much in common, including their Japanese and scientific background, as well as their composite close circles.

Cover Mako Yoko - Small Version

BEFORE MAKO CAME YOKO – Free #Kindle Days (July 1-2, 2015)

Free Kindle Days Before Mako Do you like Science Fiction? Did you enjoy Pacific Rim? Are complex female characters important to you? Then, you don’t want to miss out on the free Kindle days for Before Mako Came Yoko: Comparative Study of Pacific Rim and Yoko Tsuno. You can get it for free on Amazon, today and tomorrow! Enjoy

In 2013, Mako Mori, from Guillermo Del Toro’s Science Fiction movie ‘Pacific Rim’, provoked extensive fan engagement. Much praise was given to the character because of her personality and her unique narrative. Yet, a character very similar to Mako emerged decades prior to her: Yoko Tsuno, the main character from the eponymous comic book series created by Belgian author Roger Leloup. Mako and Yoko having much in common, including their Japanese and scientific background, as well as their composite close circles.

Next Week on the Blog

June has been a  wonderful month for this blog and there is still more in store for the rest of the summer! See what is going to happen next week:

On Tuesday, Johnamarie Macias returns with the third and last installation of her series Connecting Through Star Wars.

On Wednesday and Thursday, Before Mako Came Yoko: Comparative Study of Pacific Rim and Yoko Tsuno, will be available for free on Kindle.

On Thursday, The Digital Quill Answers returns!

And if you missed it earlier this week, I wrote about Star Wars: The Old Republic on Comparative Geeks.

Have a wonderful weekend!

Photo Credit: Caspe Sparsoe.

Photo Credit: Caspe Sparsoe.

Announcing Free Kindle Days (July 1-2, 2015) for BEFORE MAKO CAME YOKO

Free Kindle Days Before MakoDo you like Science Fiction? Did you enjoy Pacific Rim? Are complex female characters important to you? Then, you won’t want to miss out on the free Kindle days for Before Mako Came Yoko: Comparative Study of Pacific Rim and Yoko Tsuno.

On July 1 and 2, this short nonfiction read will be available for free on Amazon.

In 2013, Mako Mori, from Guillermo Del Toro’s Science Fiction movie ‘Pacific Rim’, provoked extensive fan engagement. Much praise was given to the character because of her personality and her unique narrative. Yet, a character very similar to Mako emerged decades prior to her: Yoko Tsuno, the main character from the eponymous comic book series created by Belgian author Roger Leloup.

Mako and Yoko having much in common, including their Japanese and scientific background, as well as their composite close circles.

Recent Guest Posts

ID-10048468 - Book On Wooden Floor Stock Image - Kookkai_nakThis week has been another one where I have showed up here and there across the blogosphere! I am very happy to be able to contribute to so many interesting blogs. Thank you to all owners for inviting me to write for you!

Have a good weekend!

Book Release – Before Mako Came Yoko: Comparative Study of Pacific Rim and Yoko Tsuno

Cover Mako Yoko - Small Version

Title: Before Mako Came Yoko: Comparative Study of Pacific Rim and Yoko Tsuno

Genre: nonfiction, media studies, gender studies

Synopsis: In 2013, Mako Mori, from Guillermo Del Toro’s Science Fiction movie Pacific Rim, provoked extensive fan engagement. Much praise was given to the character because of her personality and her unique narrative. Yet, a character very similar to Mako emerged decades prior to her: Yoko Tsuno, the main character from the eponymous comic book series created by Belgian author Roger Leloup.

Amazon Links: US, Canada, Australia, UK.

Goodreads: Book Page.

I am happy to announce the release of my latest nonfiction title Before Mako Came Yoko: Comparative Study of Pacific Rim and Yoko Tsuno. If you enjoy either franchise or are curious about media representation of female characters, I especially recommend it. Happy reading!

Upcoming Book Release – Before Mako Came Yoko: Comparative Study of Pacific Rim and Yoko Tsuno (nonfiction eBook)

Cover Mako Yoko - Small VersionOn May 20th, I am releasing a new nonfiction eBook (is e-booklet a word?) focusing on a movie I love (Pacific Rim) and my all time favorite comic book series (Yoko Tsuno). I wrote the original version of this paper a while ago but decided to move forward with publishing it as a short Kindle Read. This eBook is available for pre-order on all Amazon sites! I hope you will enjoy it.

Title: Before Mako Came Yoko: Comparative Study of Pacific Rim and Yoko Tsuno

Genre: nonfiction, media studies, gender studies

Synopsis: In 2013, Mako Mori, from Guillermo Del Toro’s Science Fiction movie Pacific Rim, provoked extensive fan engagement. Much praise was given to the character because of her personality and her unique narrative. Yet, a character very similar to Mako emerged decades prior to her: Yoko Tsuno, the main character from the eponymous comic book series created by Belgian author Roger Leloup.

Amazon Links: US, Canada, Australia, UK.

Yoko Tsuno: Smart Women, Science and Space Ships

This is my guest blog post at quaintjeremy’s blog, where I talk about my all time favorite comic book series, Yoko Tsuno.

Source: Amazon France.

Source: Amazon France.

quaintjeremy's thoughts

by Natacha Guyot

When I was eight years old, I remember getting a Millenium Falcon toy (which I still have) that was large enough to have quite a few details included inside and not just outside. The day I got it, I also received another gift: one of the volumes from the Yoko Tsuno comic series. It turned out to be the 20th volume, that included not only a time travel story but also bonus drawings with concepts for the previous books. I had no idea when I got sucked up into The Astrologer of Bruges that I would fall in love with this series and that its female protagonist would become one of my greatest inspirations, right up with characters such as Leia Organa and Mara Jade from Star Wars, Jo March from Little Women or Dana Scully from The X-Files.

The Yoko Tsuno series was created…

View original post 752 more words

Book Review: Star Wars: Dawn of the Jedi – Into the Void, Links: Feminism, Star Wars, Asian-American, Television

Because of my Angel marathon, my regular TV watching has fell to the side for the time being. I am hoping to do some catch up this weekend though. I do have quite a few shows that are going to end soon, though I hope that most, if not all of them, will be renewed! I have also spent some time reading over the past few days and have picked Star Wars: Dawn of the Jedi – Into The Void by Tim Lebbon again. I had started it in February but had paused, because of doing too many other things.

Source: Wookieepedia.

Source: Wookieepedia.

I devoured the rest of the book once I picked it up again. I enjoy reading about the older times of galactic history. I know that there was a comic series made after this book and I liked checking a preview in the novel, but I’m not planning to read it. I admit that I am not such a comic book fan. Besides my beloved Yoko Tsuno series, I mostly stick to a few older Star Wars comic books, though I still want to read the ones about Firefly, Buffy, Angel and The X-Files.

I liked the way Dawn of the Jedi – Into the Void was written and structured. I normally don’t like having changes of tense, but it worked well for the memories and the present. It was different and I found it engaging. I also liked the different quotes opening each chapter.

I liked the main character. Lanoree was a very interesting one and seeing her journey(s) and how she has evolved and the trials she faces made the book a great read. I also loved seeing early days of the Jedi, even before they were actually called that in precise spelling. The fact that they didn’t wield lightsabers yet, and that they threaded on a much thinner line between light and dark and all the philosophical implications, made the book quite fascinating to me. It reminded me of Vaapad and how only few Jedi Masters used it later on. This philosophical aspect was very engaging.

Links: Feminism, Star Wars, Asian-American, Television

My Writing Process Blog Hop

Image courtesy of khunaspix / FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Image courtesy of khunaspix / FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Thank you very much, Hayley (from Books Are Delicious) for tagging me in this writing process blog hop!

What Am I Working On?

The timing of this blog hop feels a little surreal to me, for right now I am not working on anything, since I have been suffering from a bad burnout all of April. I hope to be back on track around mid May though. I have been working on a lot of nonfiction/academic projects for the past year though. Right now, I have turned in the finished draft of my contracted book, Women in Science Fiction Television, so this is one huge accomplishment for me. I also have a few other papers (about Supernatural, Farscape, Avatar, Terminator Salvation, Star Wars) awaiting publication, but which are completed, unless I need to touch them up per the editor’s request. You can find all my published and upcoming publications on this page. I also am waiting on answers for other possible publications (about Yoko Tsuno, Pacific Rim, Star Wars, James Cameron’s Science Fiction movies) so I hope some of them will be positive!

The next project I want to tackle once I am back to normal and regular writing (besides my usual Star Wars roleplaying writing hobby which helps my creative muse and keeps me in the writing loop even when I suffer from academic burnout lie now) is a book proposal about Dana Scully from the X-Files. I have a few places where I plan to submit it to and I really hope I can find a publisher because I am very excited about this book project.

How Does My Work Differ From Others of Its Genre?

I work a lot on female characters in Science Fiction narratives, most of them on screen (Television, Cinema, Video games). I know I am not the only one who does this, but I am often interested in exploring characters through theme based comparison, as shown in my book, and also certain types of characters, such as what I called the Warrior Mothers (which I hope to expand on in the future). I am well aware that there is still a lot of room to get more layered and richer female characters, but being able to see the good ones that existed, even with some limitations at times, is very important for me. I also have side interests that nourish my main research axis, such as vidding, some 1990’s and 2000’s Bollywood movies, and some French series and movies.

The fact that I write about what I am passionate about is also a driving force in my work and I believe that it shows, although I am careful not to be blinded by some personal preferences. I also don’t mind sharing and writing about the sometimes not so popular opinions I can have regarding certain productions or characters. I believe that all opinions when expressed clearly, politely can bring positive things to a discussion.

Why Do I Write What I Write?

I have written since as far as I can remember, and I already liked telling stories before this. I dabbed into poetry when I was a child, wrote my first novella (Science Fiction for children) when fifteen and completed my first novel (YA dark fantasy) when I was twenty. Neither of these are published so far, though I have good hope to self publish the novella later this year. They are both in French though. I still have lots of notes for other novels, series of novels either in Science Fiction or Fantasy, but I haven’t touched original fiction in years. I believe I will go back to this one day, but now, it is academic writing that is my priority and what I like doing best.

I wrote several research papers over the past decade due to my lengthy studies in film and media studies. In 2009, I started a Ph.D. (which I quit in 2012), so publications and conferences were important. This gave me a renewed and more vibrant love for academic writing, papers and books. Along with my other projects, my writing has helped me establish myself as an independent scholar. I enjoy being able to write about so many topics that I love and being able to contribute to conversations and research about them.

How Does Your Writing Process Work?

I always keep a notebook with me when I’m not at the computer because I tend to have ideas for future papers/books out of the blue. I have four sub folders in my academic writing one: archive (drafts of published papers and documents from previous talks), in progress (what is accepted for publication but not published yet), published (final digital versions of published papers except when they were published in hard copies. These ones are on a shelf in my room) and various. The last sub folder comprises sub sub folders with what is submitted (and for which I am awaiting answers), book projects, WIP (some proposals that were turned down but that I can rework/resubmit at a later date) and one document which is my master list of paper ideas. This scary thing never ceases to grow.

I like being organized so I know where I can find things and I make sure to update my master list whenever I have a new paper idea. The book ideas tend to stand on their own as mentioned above. I admit that I don’t work on any projects, beyond the note taking, unless I have a place to submit it to for publication. I don’t like writing when I have nowhere to submit to. Finding call for papers where I can submit is extremely important for my nonfiction/academic creativity and focus, especially with all the trillion ideas I have. So, I check this site a few times a week, to see which call for papers I can respond to and then I go on the hunt in my master list and turned down abstracts to find something matching and that I feel like working on at the moment. My upcoming book proposal about Scully necessitated further research for publishers though, as I am interested in reaching out to American University Presses. I like that just like for other papers and previous books, there are guidelines to the different places I can submit to.

I enjoy working with deadlines and word counts. It helps me organize my schedule (so I make sure that I don’t accidentally pile up tons of deadlines at once and panic) and progress in my work. Right now, I am already with three other calls for paper I could answer to, depending on how things go.  I always then work from my notes and then make sure to establish the structure of the paper or book, so I can break my word count into smaller parts. I tend to focus on a project at a time when writing. When I was writing my book for example, I was focusing on other papers in between chapters. It is funny how I can easily multitask, but writing several projects at the same time doesn’t work for me.

I always try to be early on schedule, and the fact that all my writing goes through a friend of mine who has extensive experience editing, helps a lot, because she needs time to do the proofreading and editing work before I can submit. I admit that writing in English is much more natural to me now than writing in French, and I am glad to see the improvement I have gone through over the past few years, both thanks to my academic writing and my roleplaying hobby.

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